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improving the lives of

KANSAS KIDS

Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG):
2017 – 2018 Report

improving the lives of

KANSAS KIDS

Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG):
2017 – 2018 Report

What is the Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG)?

What is the Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG)?

The Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG) aims to improve school readiness for children at risk. Funding for ECBG is provided by the Kansas Children’s Cabinet and Trust Fund (KCCTF) for programs that serve children ages zero to five years old and their families. The KCCTF takes a systematic approach to the goal of school readiness through their Blueprint for Early Childhood.
The blueprint focuses on three areas of service delivery: Healthy Development, Strong Families, and Early Learning. Programs applied for and received ECBG funding to address local and regional needs. ECBG programs are best positioned to help families because they are local, accounting for the unique context of the community, and they utilize evidence-based or innovative interventions to address specific needs. ECBG grantees are held to the highest standard with required common measures to provide a statewide picture of impact.

where are

ECBG programs?
ECBG served at-risk children and families throughout the state of Kansas

where are

ECBG programs?
ECBG served at-risk children and families throughout the state of Kansas
Wichita Dodge City Salina Topeka Kansas City FRC USD 445 Four County ECBGGC HCF ELC ELC ELC ELC ELC ELC ELC ELC MCPC SPARK Raising Riley SB6 CASS UWPC ECC SSNK RCDC CAPS TOP

Counties served by ECBG grantees in 2017-2018

The dots represent the location of each grantee

More Info

For more information regarding ECBG grantees visit maps.caretools.org

who does

ECBG serve?

families

children

3,242

girls
  • Gender 45%

3,860

boys
2127 children were of Hispanic/Latino/Spanish origin

ECBG

risk factors
The more risk factors a child experiences, the less likely they are to be school ready.
(Pratt, M. E., McClelland, M. M., Swanson, J., & Lipscomb, S. T., 2016)

Children who
had an identified developmental delay

1,152

Children

Children and families whose first language is not English

1,325

Children

1,270

Caregivers

Teen Parents

577

Caregivers

Families who qualified for participation in the federal free or reduced lunch program

4,697

Families served struggled with poverty
Poverty poses a significant barrier to school readiness.  As a result, children start school at a disadvantage.

(Issacs, J.B., 2012)

5568 children and families had risk factors associated with poor school readiness

Visit https://schoolready.caretools.org for more information
about risk and protective factors for school readiness

Overall Risk

Number of risk factors per family

(0 – 4 or more)

# families

ECBG serves high risk families and children.

how ECBG helps

at-risk families

Programs

by # of children served
  • PreK – 1,732 90.75%
  • Early Learning Environments – 438 23%
  • PreK & Early Learning for Children with Special Needs – 342 17%
  • PreK & Early Learning Infrastructure – 890 45%
  • Social-Emotional Classroom & Family Consultation – 677 34%
  • Home Visiting – 854 43%
  • Parent Education – 290 15%
  • Mental & Behavioral Health Services – 209 10%
  • Case Management – 148 8%

Our Focus

MORE
Healthy Development encompasses two areas of ECBG services: Social Emotional Development and Early Identification. All ECBG programs provide developmental and social emotional screening to increase early identification of delays and provide referrals for services. ECBG programs also provide teacher coaching and individual support for children to promote social emotional development.
MORE
The Early Learning programs throughout ECBG provide early care and PreK in literacy rich environments. High quality classrooms, which promote school readiness, are supported through infrastructure and consultation programs.
MORE
Programs to address Strong Families include home visiting, parent education and case management. Strong families provide safe, stable and nurturing environments to promote school readiness. These programs also assist parents in providing skilled positive parenting.
ECBG implements a broad range of early intervention programing for at-risk children and families.

Healthy

Development

Children with delays, who are identified for services early, have a better chance to hit developmental milestones and be ready for school on time.

(Guevara, et al. 2013; Limbos & Joyce, 2011)

6,182

children were screened for
developmental delays

6,487

were screened for social-emotional concerns

3,029

children were identified as at-risk
ECBG supports early and frequent screening to identify developmental delays and promote early intervention.

Early

Learning

Of the many services ECBG provides for at-risk families, 3402 children are served through early learning and education.

499 0-3 year-old children had their
progress in communication monitored.
1,847 3-5 year-old children
were monitored for progress in numeracy.
1,519 4 year-old children were
monitored for progress in literacy.
C

Though at higher risk than most programs,

419

made gains in communication development
C

1,380

children school ready in pre-numeracy
C

1,184

children school ready in language comprehension
C

546

children school ready in phonemic awareness

Early communication is a precursor to early literacy skills, which has been linked to positive literacy outcomes in childhood.

(Cabell, Justice, Konold, & McGinty, 2011; Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998)

Mathematical skills at PreK are strongly associated with academic success in later years.

(Duncan et al., 2007)

Oral language predicts literacy and reading outcomes.

(Burchinal & Roberts, 2004)

Phonemic awareness skills significantly impact reading proficiency, language, and literacy skills.

(Muter, Hulme, Snowling, & Stevenson, 2004; Chambers et al., 2016)
499 0-3 year-old children had their progress in communication monitored.

Though at higher risk than most programs,

419

made gains in communication development
w

Early communication is a precursor to early literacy skills, which has been linked to positive literacy outcomes in childhood.

(Cabell, Justice, Konold, & McGinty, 2011;
Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998)
1,847 3-5 year-old children were monitored for progress in numeracy.

1,380

children school ready in pre-numeracy

Mathematical skills at PreK are strongly associated with academic success in later years.

(Duncan et al., 2007)
1,519 4 year-old children were monitored for progress in literacy.

1,184

children school ready in language comprehension

Oral language predicts literacy and reading outcomes.

(Burchinal & Roberts, 2004)
1,519 4 year-old children were monitored for progress in literacy.

546

children school ready in phonemic awareness

Phonemic awareness skills significantly impact reading proficiency, language, and literacy skills.

(Muter, Hulme, Snowling, & Stevenson, 2004;
Chambers et al., 2016)

2,971

children were provided high quality early educational environments through ECBG.

Classroom-based early childhood education reduces negative outcomes.

(McCoy et al., 2017)
ECBG invests in high quality early learning programs to elevate school readiness.

2,971

children were provided high quality early educational environments through ECBG.

Classroom-based early childhood education reduces negative outcomes.

(McCoy et al., 2017)
ECBG invests in high quality early learning programs to elevate school readiness.

Strong

Families

School readiness can also be linked back to the child’s family and home environment.

ECBG educated and supported caregivers through home visiting, case management and parent education programs.

564 families were observed for progress in providing home environments which promote school readiness.
C

536

families who participated in home visiting programs were found to be supportive of early learning
465 families were observed for progress in nurturing parenting.
C

393

caregivers engaged in positive parenting after receiving intensive home visiting, case management and/or parent education intervention

Supportive, skilled parenting has an overall impact on school readiness by impacting a child’s:

• Academic development
• Social development
• Language and literacy skills
(Webster-Stratton, C. H., Reid, M. J. & Beauchaine, T., 2011; Dotterer, A. M., Iruka, I. U., & Pungello, E.,2012; Isaacs, J. B.,2012)
ECBG empowers families to provide home environments that support school readiness.

Why continue investing in

Early Childhood

“Child poverty is growing in the United States; investing in comprehensive birth-to-five early childhood education is a powerful and cost-effective way to mitigate negative consequences on child development and adult opportunity."

(Heckman, J. J., Garcia, J. L., Leaf, D. E., and Prados, M. J., 2016)

Invest

Invest funding and resources in birth-to-five early childhood programs to yield equal opportunity for successful child development in at-risk children and families.
$14,653,466
was invested in ECBG-funded programs


ECBG served
7,102 children
and
6,146 families
throughout the state of Kansas

Implement

Provide comprehensive, high-quality programs focused on Healthy Development, Early Learning, and Strong Families.
89 different programs statewide addressed the areas of Healthy Development, Early Learning, and Strong Families for at-risk children and families.

PreK * Early Learning Environments * PreK and Early Learning Infrastructure * Parent Education * Home Visiting * Mental & Behavioral Health  Services * Case Management

Short-term outcomes =

long-term gains

Identify children at-risk through early and frequent screening, and intervene with the goal of school readiness.

6,585 children

screened for delays
Intervention from these programs resulted
in positive academic outcomes related to school readiness.
Intervention from these programs resulted in positive academic outcomes related to school readiness.
On an annual investment of $14,643,465 =
13% potential annual return on investment
High-quality birth-to-five programs for disadvantaged children can deliver a 13% per year return on investment.

– Heckman